share
by Sarah J.F. Braley | September 01, 2016

In responding to M&C's biennial salary survey (see results here), planners were able to add additional comments while answering some questions, a selection of which follows.

When asked which direct responsibilities they have for meeting planning, respondents said they negotiate the terms of the agreement (86 percent), influence the hotel/facility selection (84 percent) and influence the destination selection (83 percent). Some also set the meeting budget (56 percent), make the final decision on the hotel/facility selection (45 percent), set the agenda (42 percent) and make the final decision on destination selection (37 percent). In addition, 11 percent added other areas they handle for their events:

• Working with content team to develop programming and working with speakers

• Sales. Marketing. Do it all

• Manage all logistics -- room block management, all F&B, meeting room setups, A/V, shipping, registration, all planning and communications with venue, etc.

• All logistical/coordinating elements

• Gather locations and rates

• Influence catering and entertainment decisions

• A/V selection; off-site suggestions and selection; creative creation with partners

• Calendaring, scheduling, checking availability for all parties and coordinate

• Production

• Organize all facets of event -- invitations, registration, etc. Act as emcee of conferences

• The individual that I am doing the meeting for provides me with the budget.

• Menu (BEO) and DMC needs

• Operate the program from RFP until final bill

• Liaise with sponsors, manage logistics

• Curriculum development

• Create learning objectives, recruit presenters, get CEUs

• Plan food and beverage, setups, A/V needs, speaker coordination, planning-committee coordination

• Hiring staff, work with speaker selection committee, recruit sponsors and exhibitors

• Drive small and medium enterprises to develop presentation content and assure standards of delivery

• New job -- have not found out yet. Mostly doing membership now, but I will help with meetings, too. Will definitely handle registration duties

• Strong influence on destination and hotel final decisions

• All venue and service contracts, production, logistics

• Conference marketing and conference logistics

• Recruit speakers, obtain CEUs, all marketing and everything else

• Transportation, decorator, F&B

• Get speakers, manage abstract submission, review and selection process for scientific and programmatic abstracts, and lots of other public-health program-related efforts

• Volunteers, registration, sponsorship, marketing

• Oversee delegate elections

• Bill reconciliation, on-site management

• Influence decision on vendor selection

• Guarantor

• We do it ALL, from initial RFP to running the meeting to balancing the master account and sending the thank-yous!

• The actual meeting management -- room selection and set, food and beverage, room block management, etc.

• All logistics: transportation (air and ground), event specs; I serve as the company's travel manager, as well

Respondents also had some additional comments when asked what would make them happier in their work:

• The opportunity to work from home

• Timely decision-making from management

• Too many people have to weigh in; autonomy extremely limited

• Better job

• Less volume; fewer items hitting my plate when leaders don't know where else to assign the work

• More paid time off/vacation

• Title change

• More staff assistance for task-oriented work so I may focus on more inventive/creative ideas

• More support from management and other director-level colleagues. More job security -- I don't feel like management is invested in our events and would rather sell it off to a third party.

• Nothing. Very happy with position. Very flexible, good pay, feel appreciated

• Ability to be more creative with meetings/events

• Better communication; last-minute decisions increasing stress

• I really thrive on the details; working as much and as hard as I do, I'm unable to really perform my job to the best of my abilities since I'm so overworked.

• I'd really hoped to plan meetings for a nonprofit that I really cared about.

• Working in a small company, I do not have a benefits package and I am very concerned as I begin to build a family.

• More teleworking options

• I can't quite put my finger on what's wrong.

• The industry has been really intense the last 12-18 months.

• Receiving hotel commissions in a timely manner

• More hours in the day!!!

• Larger budget for venue needs

• Better communication within the organization and more alignment of goals

• Fewer rules and regulations for government meetings

• Better management from the ground all the way up. Less dictatorial management. Better working environment

• I work for the state. Any of us who have been here for more than 10 years (I have been here for 17) have not had raises in 8 years. Only the newer people get "merit" increases...until they are maxed out in their salary range...regardless of the "merit" of their work. Extreme morale crusher.