by By Michael J. Shapiro | August 01, 2009
0809NLR fear2A planner's job is one that generally can't be done entirely from behind a desk -- so it's no surprise that business might encroach on personal time. But thanks to technology, say meeting professionals, separating the two has become increasingly difficult.  

More than four-fifths (81 percent) of 194 planners surveyed by M&C in June acknowledged that technology such as mobile devices and social networking sites makes it tougher to keep their work and personal lives separate. Only 5 percent said they don't generally do work outside of business hours; most respondents (89 percent) read work e-mail, and 60 percent check voice mail.

Vacation time is no exception. While 20 percent generally don't work on vacation, 73 percent do read work e-mail, and 45 percent check voice mail. Thirty-nine percent bring work with them. One planner replied, simply, "What's a vacation?"

Friends and business associates are often blended on LinkedIn (39 percent) and Facebook (36 percent). Interestingly, many respondents don't have Twitter (78 percent), Facebook (41 percent) or LinkedIn (38 percent) accounts.

Meanwhile, the workday is getting longer for many. Nearly two-thirds (63 percent) of planners feel pressured to work longer hours due to the state of the economy.


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