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by Allen J. Sheinman | August 19, 2011
The list

Like any very busy job, managing all the myriad details of meetings leaves many of us eager to take the path of least resistance when it comes to eating. And that usually means easy, tasty and extremely fattening foods. As a cautionary note, the folks at the Center for Science in the Public Interest have released their annual worst-foods list, from which we have chosen some especially egregious examples.

Marie Callender's Chicken Pot Pie (16.5 oz). At first glance, this 520-calorie-per-serving, easy-to-microwave meal is fatty enough, until you realize that one whole pie, which is what most consumers likely wolf down, comprises two servings. Just doing the math will give you a coronary.

Chipotle Chicken Burrito. This popular chain's tortilla-wrapped concoction of rice, pinto beans, cheese, chicken, sour cream and salsa weighs in at 970 calories, with 18 grams of saturated fat -- the equivalent, as CSPI notes, of three 6-inch Subway BLT Classic Subs. Perhaps they should rename the place Chubotle.

Starbucks Venti White Chocolate Mocha (20 oz). For those who think it must be better to grab a beverage than consume a fattening meal, think again. Packing 580 calories and 15 grams of saturated fat, this liquid will quickly turn to solid -- right where your pants used to close.

Stone Cold Creamery's Oh Fudge! Shake (16 oz). At 1,250 calories, this makes the Starbucks Venti White Chocolate Mocha look like a Diet Snapple. And when it comes to the 24-oz size, well, let's just say you might as well get a bucket of lard and a putty knife to pack your arteries real good.

Olive Garden Tour of Italy.
This entrée, comprising equal parts lasagna, lightly breaded chicken parmigiana and creamy fettuccine Alfredo, is aptly named, as it provides enough calories (1,450) and saturated fat (33 grams) to sustain a tour group. Added plus: After consuming this dish's 3,830 milligrams of sodium, you could truthfully say you had a hard day in the salt mines.

Source: Center for Science in the Public Interest (cspinet.org)