by Andrea Doyle | March 14, 2019
Boston's lively hotel scene just got livelier as two major downtown properties - the Langham and the Taj Hotel have announced major renovations, while a third, the W Boston, has just unveiled a $14 million facelift.
The historic Langham, Boston, will close on April 1 for a full renovation and repositioning scheduled to last until mid-2020. The project will create new guest rooms as well as a new Club Lounge, destination bar and signature restaurant. Other work includes a revamped lobby and updated event and banquet spaces. The interior design is being executed by Richmond International, the same firm that refreshed the interiors of the Langham, London and the Langham, Chicago. Richmond says the renovation will reflect the rich history of the property, which was once the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, and will highlight the unique architectural elements of the building.

A renovation also is underway at the Taj Boston Hotel, which will result in a new floor plan, redesigned guest rooms and event spaces, new signature dining experiences and a reimagined entrance on famed Newbury Street. In addition, 13 guest rooms will be added to bring the hotel's total to 286; all 16,000 square feet of event space will be renovated and updated with modern functionality, and the seasonal rooftop will be converted into a year-round space. Completion is slated for early 2020.

The hotel opened in 1927 as the first Ritz-Carlton in the United States. Its exterior design combines traditional and Neoclassical elements, with picturesque Boston Public Garden as a backdrop.

"We are thrilled to share our design and reintroduce the hotel to Boston," said Carlos Bueno, general manager, Taj Boston. "Our new concept embraces both the rich history of the hotel and timeless details that, when partnered together, radiate a uniquely Boston feel."

While the Taj and Langham undergo their revamps, the W Boston has unveiled its second phase of renovations that includes all 238 guest rooms and suites, 5,000 square feet of event space and, in partnership with the prestigious Jules Place gallery, a curated in-house display of both local and internationally renowned artists on the mezzanine floor. The guest rooms were outfitted in contrasting colors and textures as a nod to Boston's mix of Puritan and rebellious history.